Current Epigraphy
ISSN: 1754-0909

2 January, 2008

Available for review from BMCR

Filed under: publications,review — Gabriel Bodard @ 13:11

The following titles of possible interest to epigraphers are available for review from BMCR this month (see BMCR 2008.01.01):

Bauer, Franz Alto, and Christian Witschel, Statuen in der Spaetantike. Wiesbaden: Ludwig Reichert, 2007. Pp. 500; ills. 200. EUR 98.00. ISBN 978-3-89500-576-3.

Koch, Guntram (ed.), Akten des Symposiums des Sarkophag-Corpus 2001. Marburg, 2. bis 7 Juli 2001. Sarkophag-Studien Band 3. Mainz am Rhein: von Zabern, 2007. Pp. xii, 354; ills. 32, pls. 120. Tafeln. EUR 98.50. ISBN 978-3-8053-3501-0.

Rayboud, Marilynne E., and Patrick Sims-Williams (edd. and trans.), A Corpus of Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire Containing Celtic Personal Names. Aberystwyth, Wales: CMCS Publications, Department of Welsh, Old College, 2007. Pp. ix, 284; maps 2. GBP 18.00. ISBN 978-0-9527478-7-1.

Rayboud, Marilynne E., and Patrick Sims-Williams (edd.), The Geography of Celtic Personal Names in the Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire. Aberystwyth, Wales: CMCS Publications, Department of Welsh, Old College, 2007. Pp. v, 210; maps 3. GBP 18.00. ISBN 978-0-9527478-6-4.

1 Comment »

  1. Please note that the name is Marilynne E. Raybould – Rayboud was a misprint on the BMCR site. Incidentally, her ‘Corpus of Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire Containing Celtic Personal Names’ may be useful as a classbook, as there are not that many cheap collections of inscriptions from all over the Empire with English translations. If anybody wants to buy two or more copies for class use, they can get them direct from CMCS (pps@aber.ac.uk) at 12 pounds each.

    Here is more information on Marilynne Raybould’s two books and on another epigraphical book from CMCS:
    Alexander Falileyev, Celtic Dacia: Personal Names, Place-Names and Ethnic Names of Celtic Origin in Dacia and Scythia Minor (2007) ISBN 978-0-9557182-0-5. xiv + 182 pp., 4 maps. – Price: 15 pounds. Published by CMCS Publications, Department of Welsh, Old College, Aberystwyth, Wales SY23 2AX, GB. Dr Alexander Falileyev investigates the Celtic linguistic evidence from the pre-Roman and Roman period for an area which broadly corresponds to the region in which Romanian is now spoken. His main evidence consists of personal names and divine names in inscriptions, plus a significant number of Celtic ethnic names and place-names, recorded by Ptolemy and others.

    A Corpus of Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire Containing Celtic Personal Names. Selected, edited, and translated by Marilynne E. Raybould & Patrick Sims-Williams (2007) ISBN 978-0-9527478-7-1. ix + 284pp., 2 maps. – Price: 18 pounds. Published by CMCS Publications, Department of Welsh, Old College, Aberystwyth, Wales SY23 2AX, GB. A Corpus of Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire containing Celtic Personal Names introduces a wide range of readers to an historically and sociologically interesting selection of 814 Latin inscriptions, from most parts of Europe, edited and translated in full for the first time. The inscriptions, mostly of the first to third centuries A.D., shed a varied light on the everyday life of the ‘ancient Celts’ as they came under Roman rule. They come from sites ranging from Portugal to Bulgaria and from Scotland to northern Italy. Dr Marilynne E. Raybould graduated in Latin from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. She is the co-author with Patrick Sims-Williams of The Geography of Celtic Personal Names in the Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire (Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2007). Her Ph.D. dissertation was published as A Study of Inscribed Material from Roman Britain: An Inquiry into Some Aspects of Literacy in Romano-British Society (Oxford, 1999). Professor Patrick Sims-Williams graduated in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, & Celtic from the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Britain and Early Christian Europe: Studies in Early Medieval History and Culture (Aldershot, 1995), The Celtic Inscriptions of Britain (Oxford, repr. 2004), Ancient Celtic Place-Names in Europe and Asia Minor (Oxford, 2006), and Studies on Celtic Languages before the Year 1000 (Aberystwyth, 2007). His Ph.D. dissertation was published as Religion and Literature in Western England, 600-800 (Cambridge, repr. 2005).

    Marilynne E. Raybould & Patrick Sims-Williams, The Geography of Celtic Personal Names in the Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire (2007) ISBN 978-0-9527478-6-4. v + 210pp, 3 maps. – Price: 18 pounds. Published by CMCS Publications, Department of Welsh, Old College, Aberystwyth, Wales SY23 2AX, GB. Latin inscriptions containing Celtic personal names are an important source for the early linguistic geography of the Celtic language. The Geography of Celtic Personal Names in the Latin Inscriptions of the Roman Empire exploits a database referring to more than 80,000 persons in some 45,000 Latin inscriptions from the Roman provinces, mostly of the first to third centuries A.D. The distribution of Celtic personal names sheds light on where Celtic was or had been spoken and where Celtic-language names retained some prestige. The Latin inscriptions confirm that Celtic languages were used well beyond the areas from which inscriptions survive in ancient Celtic languages such as Lepontic, Celtiberian, and Gaulish.

    Comment by Patrick Sims-Williams — 3 January, 2008 @ 13:21

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