Current Epigraphy
ISSN: 1754-0909

18 March, 2013

Civic Honours, Tours, April 6, 2013

Filed under: events — Gabriel Bodard @ 14:30

CIVIC HONOURS – LES HONNEURS CIVIQUES
The politics of honour in the Greek cities of Roman Imperial times (http://www.honneurs-civiques.org/en/) invites you to a workshop in Tours on 6 April 2013

The collective research project “Civic honours” is concerned with the system of public honours that Greek cities bestowed upon their good citizens and foreign benefactors (praise, crown, statue, prohedria, public funerals, and so on). The aim of the project is to study the development of this system, and in particular the rise of honorific monuments, during the Imperial period (1st-3d c. AD), when the Greek world had become part of the Roman Empire. Co-directed by Anna Heller and Onno van Nijf, this international project brings together scholars from France, Greece, the Netherlands, Germany and the United Kingdom, who employ various approaches and methods: epigraphy, archaeology, literature, linguistic theory. After several workshops in France, Greece and the Netherlands, a final international conference, scheduled for the Spring of 2014, will gather all participants and will be followed by the publication of a collective volume. (See for a report on Athens workshop of 2 February 2013: http://www.honneurs-civiques.org/en/athens/). (more…)

22 January, 2013

PhD Studentship in Latin Epigraphy (Warwick)

Filed under: awards — Gabriel Bodard @ 16:33

Posted for Alison Cooley:

AHRC Research Project

‘Facilitating Access to Latin inscriptions in Britain’s oldest public museum through scholarship and technology’

Dept of Classics & Ancient History, University of Warwick

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/postgrads/epigraphy/ahrcproject

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship (Home/EU fees + maintenance) in Latin epigraphy, to write a thesis on the topic ‘Literacy and Epigraphy in Britain from Roman to Mediaeval Times (1st-11th C.)’. This is associated with the Facilitating Access to Latin Inscriptions project, directed by Dr Alison Cooley, in collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum and Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents, University of Oxford. 1st Oct 2013-30 Sept 2016

How to apply: Please send a letter of application, c.v., and ask two academic referees to submit confidential references on your behalf to: Dr Alison Cooley, Dept of Classics & Ancient History, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL. a.cooley@warwick.ac.uk. You are very welcome to email for further information.

Deadline for Applications: 12 noon, Monday 11th March 2013.

4 January, 2013

Two epigraphic fellowships/travel awards

Filed under: awards — Gabriel Bodard @ 14:35

With a hat-tip to the BES newsletter, two fast approaching deadlines:

1. The DAI (Deutsche Archäologische Institut) has two bursaries available, one for travel and one for a research visit to the archaeological library in Munich (next deadline January 15th, 2013):

DAI Reisestipendium
http://www.dainst.org/en/scholarship/reisestipendium-2012-2013?ft=all

DAI Wülfing Stipendium
http://www.dainst.org/en/scholarship/w%C3%BClfing-stipendium-201213?ft=all

2. The Center for Epigraphical and Paleographical Studies at Ohio State University is offering short-term fellowships (1-4 months) to visit OSU and use the library and other resources of the center (deadline January 31st 2013):

http://epigraphy.osu.edu/fellowships

10 December, 2012

Attic Inscriptions Online (in translation)

Filed under: publications — Gabriel Bodard @ 19:53

Sent by Finlay McCourt to the Digital Classicist list:

List members may be interested in a new website designed to make available the inscriptions of Athens and Attica in English translation:

www.atticinscriptions.com

It is being launched with translations of the 281 inscribed laws and decrees of Athens, 352/1-322/1 BC, which have recently been edited by Stephen Lambert as IG II3 1, 292-572.

We plan to develop the site, enhancing its functionality and increasing the range of information supplied, and to expand it in due course to include all Attic inscriptions.

(As McCourt points out, there are so far only a handful of inscriptions, in English translation only [no original text], and with only simple search and browse by bibliographical reference as entry points, but hopefully this will develop into a useful resource for historians and students.)

21 November, 2012

RATIARIA Field school 2013

Filed under: training — Gabriel Bodard @ 11:34

Applications for attendance at the 2013 Ratiaria field school in Bulgaria close on November 30, 2012. Students will participate in the dig and have the opportunity to study Latin epigraphy on-site. From the introduction:

In 2013 the archaeological digs will focus on the discovered in course of the last season decumanus maximius and Temple of Asclepius. Along with practical work at the site the students will gain experience in Latin Epigraphy, Art History, Conservation and Restoration of discovered buildings and artifacts. Several experts in Roman Archaeology will give lectures during the course. In addition the students will have chance to visit some of the best preserved Roman towns in the area (including Bulgaria and neighboring Serbia).

Full details, including cost, programme and application forms available at http://www.ratiaria.archbg.net/field_shool_en.html

8 October, 2012

BES travel bursaries

Filed under: BES,events — Gabriel Bodard @ 11:32

Information on applying for bursaries for the November 2012 British Epigraphy Society colloquium. Applications from students especially encouraged!

The BES regularly announces bursary schemes for students and post-docs to help with attendance at our own activities or those of other epigraphic bodies. Please watch this space for information on upcoming bursary schemes. Information on how to apply will be released on the opening date indicated with the scheme. The Society’s Steering Committee will endeavour to review your application within two weeks of the closing date and the Secretary will then inform you of the outcome of your application.

Bursary scheme: Travel bursaries for the BES Autumn Meeting in November!

Closing date: Extended: 15 October 2012

To apply for a bursary to help with attendance at the BES Autumn Colloquium in London on 17 November 2012, please send the information listed below via e-mail to the BES Secretary by the closing date of 15 October 2012.

For full details on how to apply, visit http://www.britishepigraphysociety.org/bursaries.html

24 September, 2012

New online publication: MAMA XI

Filed under: EpiDoc,publications — Gabriel Bodard @ 10:10

Please find attached a flyer advertising the online publication of a new corpus of Greek and Latin inscriptions, Monumenta Asiae Minoris Antiqua XI: Monuments from Phrygia and Lykaonia.

MAMA XI is a corpus of 387 inscriptions and other ancient monuments, 292 of which are unpublished, from Phrygia and Lykaonia recorded by Sir William Calder (1881-1960) and Dr Michael Ballance (†27 July 2006) in the course of annual expeditions to Asia Minor in 1954-1957. The monuments have been edited with full commentaries and marked-up in xml using EpiDoc electronic editorial conventions by Peter Thonemann with the assistance of Édouard Chiricat and Charles Crowther.

The full corpus was published online on 14 September 2012 at the following address: http://mama.csad.ox.ac.uk/. A print volume will be published later as a Roman Society monograph.

The MAMA XI project has been funded by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and is based at the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents in Oxford.

Peter Thonemann
Wadham College, Oxford
peter.thonemann@wadh.ox.ac.uk

14 September, 2012

Associations in Context, Copenhagen, October 11-13, 2012

Filed under: events — Gabriel Bodard @ 15:15

ASSOCIATIONS IN CONTEXT

The importance of religion for understanding ancient associations has long been recognised, and many monographs have focused specifically on cult or religious associations. The aim of this symposium is to go beyond so-called religious associations and assess more generally the role of religion in ancient associative life (with a focus on the eastern part of the Mediterranean, from ca. 300 BC to ca. AD 300). Cultic activities, and other religious aspects, such as theophoric names, seem to have been a central concern to private associations of many different kinds. The term ‘religious association’ is regularly used in scholarship, but its use and applicability need to be critically re-assessed. In an attempt to gain a more nuanced approach and a better understanding regarding the formation, organization and aims of ancient associations, this conference moves beyond the confines of religion. In a series of twenty papers on a variety of themes and locations, we shall reconsider the ways in which associations defined themselves, and examine their behaviour and interactions within the social, cultural, and sacred landscape of Hellenistic and Roman poleis.

Program and registration at: http://copenhagenassociations.saxo.ku.dk/symposium-2012/

12 September, 2012

Instrumenta Inscripta V (Verona, Sept 20-21, 2012)

Filed under: events — Gabriel Bodard @ 17:45

INSTRVMENTA INSCRIPTA V
Signacula ex aere

Aspetti epigrafici, archeologici, giuridici, prosopografici, collezionistici

Convegno Internazionale
Università degli Studi di Verona
Polo Zanotto Aula 1.1

Segreteria:
Silvia Braito: instrumentainscriptav.segret@gmail.com

(Full details including programme: Depliant_convegno instrumentainscripta V)

24 August, 2012

Pavement Signs Typology

Filed under: methodology,Pre-press — Gabriel Bodard @ 18:13

A typology for recording pavement signs.

Pavement Signs Typology (PDF)

Over many years Charlotte Roueché has been collecting examples of pavement markings, particularly at Aphrodisias and Ephesus: these have conventionally been described as gameboards, although only some of them were definitely intended for this purpose. The late R.C. Bell made a very large collection of such signs, and in 2007 they published a typology to be used for recording pavement markings and gameboards. This has now been enhanced with links to published examples, which are set out in the attached document, to be launched at the 2012 Berlin AIEGL Congress.

Colleagues are invited to provide references to further photographic illustrations, new designs to add to the typology, or any other suggestions or corrections. Please either make your contributions as a comment here, or email charlotte.roueche[at]kcl.ac.uk; the aim is to develop a shared resource, and to enable better practice in the recording of such materials.

22 August, 2012

Blogging CIEGL 2012: invitation

Filed under: CIEGL — Gabriel Bodard @ 15:58

As in previous years, Current Epigraphy will be posting reports on the papers delivered at the Berlin Epigraphic Congress next week. Watch this space, and the CIEGL category, for frequent updates.

If you are interested in contributing to this reportage, please get in touch in advance so we can sign you up with an account on the blog, and in Berlin look out for Tom Elliott or Paola Tomasi who can give you instructions and a sticker to attach to your name badge. Reports on papers should not be too long; a couple of paragraphs is fine, and you may report either a summary of the argument and/or your own response to it, as you prefer.

3 July, 2012

Seminar: Digital epigraphy beyond the Classical (London, July 6th)

Filed under: EpiDoc,events — Gabriel Bodard @ 13:49

Digital epigraphy beyond the Classical: creating (inter?)national standards for recording modern and early modern gravestones

Charlotte Tupman (KCL)

Institute of Classical Studies Digital Seminar 2012

Friday July 6th at 16:30, in Room G22/26, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Early modern and modern gravestones are a vast but rapidly decaying historical resource for the period from the 16th century to the present day. Processes of weathering, deliberate or accidental damage, the re-use of cemeteries and the uprooting and rearranging of monuments (such as the practice of removing stones from their original positions and stacking them around the edges of walls) all have an impact on both the size and the scholarly value of this body of evidence. Countless records have already been lost, which makes it particularly important to address as soon as possible the question of how to record and publish these monuments systematically and usefully.

Currently there are no agreed standards for recording such gravestones. Interested historians and volunteers in some churches or local areas have recorded their own particular monumental inscriptions, and have made these available on microfiche, CD, or in a basic form online. Typically these records only include the text itself; very rarely there might be a photograph, but almost never is any metadata recorded about the monument. The nature of these recorded examples is thus very fragmentary and inconsistent.

The experience of projects using EpiDoc and other shared standards for the recording and publication of ancient and medieval inscribed materials has shown that there is considerable value in agreeing a set of guidelines for encoding and publication. This applies to materials that span a variety of languages, geographical areas, and centuries. It is clear that many, if not most, of the standards described in the EpiDoc guidelines are appropriate for, and directly applicable to, the recording and publication of modern gravestones. This paper investigates what is required in order to make these standards a viable method of recording such a large body of data, where many of those doing the recording are not experts in epigraphy.

It is clear that considerable thought must be given to what is asked of those who are responsible for recording the monuments, and how this can best be balanced with the need to produce a scholarly resource that will be useful for local historians, genealogists and other interested parties, as well as to people who would define themselves as epigraphers and archaeologists. Crucially, the system must make it sufficiently simple to input the data, but must also ensure that the resulting records are sufficiently detailed and useful for enabling in-depth research to be undertaken. This paper discusses these challenges and suggests solutions with a view to designing a pilot project for a national (and potentially international) system for recording and publishing gravestone evidence.

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

14 May, 2012

Help with reading Greek inscription

Filed under: e-seminar,query — Gabriel Bodard @ 22:14

David Meadows posted the following call for help reading the scratched inscription on an ossuary in Jerusalem. Can any epigraphically trained readers help decipher the Greek letters? (We’ve help crowdsourced readings and e-seminars before, so I’m hopeful our readers have the expertise to help with this.)

To begin: the inscription is found one of a number of ossuaries still  in situ in a tomb in Jerusalem, so we’re dealing with a funerary context. The inscription is only seen in photos (of varying quality) because the tomb was explored via a robotic camera. When the tomb was originally excavated back in 1980 or thereabouts,  the inscription itself does not seem to have been recorded (or if it was, it has not been published). Further complicating things is the fact that the ossuaries were moved around and there are plenty of scratches thereon, which may or may not be affecting the reading of this inscription. Amongst the artifacts found in association with the ossuary inscription was this pot:

Figure 1 (more…)

27 January, 2012

EpiDoc training workshop, Calabria, June 4-7, 2012

Filed under: EpiDoc,training — Gabriel Bodard @ 14:16

EpiDoc and TEI / XML training workshop

Dipartimento di Scienze Storiche, Giuridiche, Economiche e Sociali dell’Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria
BILG Project

4 – 7 giugno 2012

The Department of Scienze Storiche, Giuridiche, Economiche e Sociali of University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria and the Department Diritto dell’Organizzazione Pubblica, Economia e Società of University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, within BILG (Inscriptiones Graecae et Latinae Bruttiorum) project, is organising an intensive training workshop of EpiDoc, with Monica Berti (Tufts University – Roma Tor Vergata), Lou Burnard (TEI Editor) and Marion Lamè (Università di Bologna).

This workshop is an introduction to the use of TEI and of EpiDoc, XML schema for the encoding and publication of literary texts and inscriptions, papyri and other documentary classical texts respectively. Participants will study the use of EpiDoc markup to record the distinctions expressed by the Leiden Conventions and traditional critical editions, and some of the issues in translating between EpiDoc and the major epigraphic and papyrological databases. The course is targeted at scholars of historical and ancient texts, epigraphic and papyrologic ones (from advanced graduate students to professors), that are interested and want to learn some of the hands-on technical aspects in the markup, encoding, and exploitation of digital editions.

The course will give a practical introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative, an introduction to EpiDoc markup and editing tools, and the text transformations with XSLT.

For more details about EpiDoc and TEI /XML, see at http://epidoc.sf.net and http://www.tei-c.org. Knowledge of Greek and/or Latin, the Leiden  Conventions, the distinctions expressed by them and the kinds of data that need to be recorded by epigraphic scholars and ancient historians are of  course essential. The course will be held in English with Italian tutors. No particular computer skills and technical expertise are required, even if the possession of an interest for computer know-how is preferable.

The workshop is free of charge and open to all, but spaces are limited (not more than 20 people) and registration as soon as possible is essential. To enrol in the training, please contact daria.spampinato@cnr.it or stefania.romeo@unirc.it with a brief statement of qualifications and interests.

11 January, 2012

Methone inscriptions (Athens, January 19)

Filed under: events,publications — Gabriel Bodard @ 16:24

Methone I: inscriptions, graffiti and trade marks in geometric and archaic pottery from the ‘Ypogeio’.

The event will be held on Thursday 19 January, 19:00 at the Megaron (Concert Hall) of Athens, Level “N. Skalkotas”, Room MC2.

Speakers include:

  • Yannis Kazazis, Professor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and Chair of the Centre’s Board
  • Lina Mendoni, General Secretary of the Ministry of Culture
  • Michalis Tiverios, Professor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and Member of the Academy of Athens
  • Yannis Tzifopoulos, Associate Professor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

The work is funded by the Greek Ministry of Education and the European Union and will be available online in a few weeks: http://www.greek-language.gr/greekLang/portal/blog/archive/2012/01/10/4039.html

For further information, please contact: glossologia@komvos.edu.gr.

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