Current Epigraphy
ISSN: 1754-0909

13 March, 2014

Rupestral Inscriptions in the Greek World

Filed under: ASGLE,events,news — Tom Elliott @ 22:05

From Laura Gawlinksi on behalf of ASGLE:

Tomorrow (March 14) is the Open Meeting of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. In addition to a summary of recent work done by the School, there will also be a special presentation by Merle Langdon entitled “Rupestral Inscriptions in the Greek World.” This event will be livestreamed so that even those of us not in Athens can enjoy it. It will also appear on the website about 1 week after the event. More information here: http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/news/eventDetails/work-of-the-school-during-2013-and-rupestral-inscriptions-in-the-greek-worl

11 January, 2014

CFP – ASGLE APA Panel, January 8-11, 2015 New Orleans, Louisiana, Deadline Feb. 1, 2014

Filed under: ASGLE,news — PaulIversen @ 14:45

2015 ASGLE APA Panel
January 8-11, 2015, New Orleans, LA

Inscriptions and Literary Sources
Organized by Paul A. Iversen.

Polybios (12.10.4-12.11.2), in an extended critique of Timaios of Tauromenion, tells us that the Sicilian historian was famous for consulting inscriptions such as dedications, stelai in the back chambers of buildings, and even proxeny decrees on the doorjambs of temples, both to write his history and to criticize his predecessors, or even to correct city records. In keeping with this long tradition of relying upon epigraphical evidence, the Society invites submissions that illuminate the interface between ancient Greek and Latin inscriptions and ancient historical or literary texts. Suitable topics include using contemporary inscriptions to supplement or correct historical texts, or using historical texts to help restore and/or explicate fragmentarily preserved inscriptions, as well as using contemporary inscriptions to improve our understanding of the historical and/or cultural milieu within which literary works, including poetry, were composed.

Abstracts will be evaluated anonymously by the ASGLE Executive Committee and should not be longer than 500 words (bibliography excluded). Please follow the APA Instructions for Individual Abstract Authors and include the ASGLE Abstract Submission Form (found at http://classics.case.edu/asgle/apa-panel/) with your Abstract. The Abstract should be sent electronically as an MS Word file along with a PDF of the ASGLE Abstract Submission Form by February 1, 2014 to: Paul Iversen, Vice-President, ASGLE at paul.iversen(at)cwru.edu. All Greek should either be transliterated or employ a Unicode font. Authors submitting abstracts must be APA members in good standing.

6 January, 2011

Eck: Documents on Bronze: A Phenomenon of the West?

Filed under: AIEGL,ASGLE,events,report — Tom Elliott @ 00:54

Today, at the First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy in San Antonio, Texas, Werner Eck presented a keynote address entitled “Documents on Bronze: A Phenomenon of the West?” I offer the following summary largely from memory, hoping that other readers present will correct errors and supplement deficiencies.

Eck’s thesis is that we can discern an essential difference in epigraphic habit across the Roman empire: normative documents of public import (i.e., publicae constitutiones) were customarily inscribed on bronze in Latin-speaking areas, whereas stone was the preferred material in Greek-speaking provinces. Bronze was clearly used everywhere, for a variety of epigraphic purposes, but with regard to public legal documents divergeant practice is argued. Eck posits that these opposing patterns were set long before the empire came into existence and were so strongly established that even centuries of Roman rule caused little erosion of the Greek pattern.

The paper begins with a helpful consideration of the range of inscribed materials and documentary types reflected in the historical record and the low survival rates for same. This theme carries on throughout the paper, and appropriate examples are marshaled to support the thesis. Some highlights: Inscriptions on wood may have constituted 90% of the inscribed documents (most intended as ephemera and now almost entirely lost). Less than one percent of military diplomata (on bronze) survive. These are found in both Latin- and Greek-speaking areas, and many have clearly appeared through at the hands of metal detectorists. As the mode of discovery is similar for many celebrated Western bronze leges, we would expect the same pattern in the east, but don’t see it. Bronze likely suffers loss disproportionately (it could be melted down for reuse, and generally was); therefore, we must imagine a disproportionate loss of normative, public texts from the West. The few Roman-period examples of normative public documents on bronze in the East are explained either as having been so specified in the originating document itself (there is evidence for such provision), or the product of Roman (pro-)magistrates doing things the way they were accustomed to do them.

Afterward, some audience members challenged Eck’s characterization of the Greek-speaking east as a place where some public documents were traditionally inscribed on wood and stone, citing examples from Argos, Athens and elsewhere during the Archaic and Classical periods. Eck maintained his thesis, seeking distinctions between the examples offered and the types of texts he feels were distinctively “on bronze” in the West, but expressed interest in getting more details that might affect his approach.

9 November, 2010

Call For Papers: ASGLE 2012 APA Panel, 5-8 January, Philadelphia, PA

Filed under: ASGLE,events — PaulIversen @ 19:39

Bilingual Inscriptions and Cultural Interaction in the Greco-Roman World

Organized by Nora Dimitrova, Stephen V. Tracy and Paul Iversen

Bilingual inscriptions are among the most exciting archaeological discoveries in the complex crossroads of civilizations and ethnicities that constituted the Greco-Roman world. Bilingual inscriptions can help decipher a new language and are of particular importance in reconstructing various aspects of cultural interaction – from personal expressions of religious worship or metrical epitaphs to official documents published throughout the Roman Empire. They reveal which language was better known in a certain community, the level of literacy in different social strata, the terminology of public administration, the specifics of local idiom, and many other facets of cultural history.

The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy welcomes papers that discuss bilingual inscriptions in the Greco-Roman world. We are interested in selecting a group of papers that treat a broad variety of topics and exemplify the interdisciplinary nature of epigraphy.

Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE and should not be longer than one page. See the ASGLE APA Panel Webpage for directions on how to submit an abstract. The deadline is February 1, 2011.

5 November, 2010

ASGLE/AIEGL First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

Filed under: AIEGL,ASGLE,events,news — PaulIversen @ 08:27

The Final Program of the First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy in San Antonio, TX on January 5, 2011 is set. For a copy of the program and information about registration, deadlines, membership, etc., see:

http://www.case.edu/artsci/clsc/asgle/congress.html

6 June, 2010

CFP: ASGLE First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

Filed under: ASGLE,events — PaulIversen @ 12:53

This is just a reminder that abstracts for ASGLE’s First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy are due on June 15, 2010. For submission directions and guidelines, see here.

22 March, 2010

ASGLE First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

Filed under: ASGLE,news — PaulIversen @ 13:36

CALL FOR PAPERS
ASGLE FIRST NORTH AMERICAN CONGRESS OF GREEK AND LATIN EPIGRAPHY

5 January 2011, San Antonio, Texas

The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (ASGLE) invites abstracts for the First North American Epigraphical Congress, to be held on January 5th, 2011 in San Antonio, Texas at the Marriott Riverwalk, over the course of a single day, immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association (APA) and the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA). The topic will be broadly defined as Greek and Latin Epigraphy.

Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE; they should include the title but not the author’s name and they should not be longer than one double-spaced page.  There is a limit of one abstract per person. The abstracts themselves, along with a completed abstract submission form, should be sent electronically as pdf files to: Nora Dimitrova, Vice-President, ASGLE, at nmd5@cornell.edu. The deadline is June 15, 2010.

Registration for the Congress must be made online here. The registration fee before December 1, 2010 is $35 for student and $50 for non-student participants, which includes a group dinner. After December 1, 2010 the rate will be $50 for students and $70 for non-students.  ASGLE full members receive a $10 discount and ASGLE student/retirees a $5.00 discount.  To become a member of ASGLE, see here.  There will be a stipend  available for at least one student whose abstract is accepted.

In the future, these congresses are expected to be held immediately before the APA/AIA meetings. This should have the additional benefit of attracting a large number of Classicists and archaeologists to the audience of the congress and promoting epigraphy among graduate students attending the meetings.

Interested scholars from all countries are encouraged to participate.

Please cross-post this announcement.

17 October, 2009

ASGLE News

Filed under: ASGLE,news — PaulIversen @ 14:39

- The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (ASGLE) will sponsor the First North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy on 5 January 2011 in San Antonio, TX one day before the annual APA/AIA meetings. At our annual Business Meeting in Anaheim, CA in early January 2010 we will decide on fees, deadlines, and abstract submission guidelines, which will be posted on the ASGLE website.

-The 2010 ASGLE APA Panel will be held in Anaheim, CA on Saturday,  January 9 from 8:30 – 11:00 AM.

Greek and Latin Inscriptions: New Discoveries
Organizers:  Paul Iversen and Stephen V. Tracy

The line-up of speakers includes:

-Nikolaos Papzarkadas, University of California, Berkeley and D. Sourlas. “A New Fragment of IG I³ 1149 (Epitaph for the Argives Killed at the Battle of Tanagra).”

-Gerald V. Lalonde, Grinnell College. “Two ‘New’ Horos Inscriptions of the Boule of the Areiopagos: Epigraphy and Topography.”

-John D. Morgan, University of Delaware. “Athens and the Aleuads.”

-Nora Dimitrova and Kevin Clinton, Cornell University. “Maroneia Honors Q. Lutatius Catulus in Samothrace.”

-Christopher Wallace, University of Toronto. “Murder, Mayhem and Salt: IPriene 111 and the publicani in Roman Asia.”

-Steven L. Tuck, Miami University. “Fistulae and Freedmen: Lead Water Pipes and Shifting Imperial Realities on the Bay of Naples.”

5 January, 2009

Upcoming ASGLE Events

Filed under: ASGLE — PaulIversen @ 18:01

Dear All, 

There are several upcoming ASGLE events:

-ASGLE Annual Business Meeting at the APA/AIA Meetings (Philadelphia, PA),  Friday, January 9, 4:30-5:30 p.m. in Room 413 of the Loews hotel (across the street from the Marriott).  All are welcome to attend.  Items to discuss include progress towards non-profit status and a possible North American conference on Epigraphy sponsored by ASGLE.

-ASGLE Joint APA/AIA Panel, “The Study and Publication of Inscriptions in the Age of the Computer,” organized by Tom Elliott and Paul Iversen.  Saturday, January 10, 8:30-11:00 a.m. in Independence I of the Marriott Hotel.  Speakers and topics include:

            1.  “Publishing Image and Text in Digital Epigraphy.” Neel Smith (College of the Holy Cross).

            2.  “Topic Maps and the Semantics of Inscriptions.” Marion Lamé (Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Italy and Université  de  Provence, Aix-Marseille 1, France).

            3.  “An Efficient Method for Digitizing Squeezes & Performing Automated Epigraphic Analysis.” Eleni Bozia, Angelos Barmpoutis and Robert S. Wagman (University of Florida).

            4.  “Opportunities for Epigraphy in the Context of 3-D Digitization.” Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London) and Ryan Baumann (Univ. of Kentucky).

-“The Etruscan Objects Speak: New Linguistic and Socio-Historical Approaches to Etruscan Epigraphy.”  Saturday, January 10, 1:30-4:30 p.m. in Independence I of the Marriott Hotel.

-CALL FOR PAPERS for the 2010 ASGLE Joint APA/AIA meetings in Anaheim, CA:  “Greek and Latin Inscriptions: New Discoveries.”  Organized by Stephen V. Tracy and Paul Iversen.

            As archaeological artifacts that preserve writing from the ancient past, inscriptions constitute one of our most valuable primary sources of evidence for the ancient Mediterranean world.  Their importance cannot be stressed too much.  The Society seeks to create a panel that will offer to the audience new and ex-citing discoveries about Greek and Latin inscriptions. The Society, therefore, welcomes papers that present new texts, new joins, new archaeological find spots, new readings, new interpretations or new methodologies.  We are particularly interested in papers that discuss truly new and important texts or really innovative interpretations or methodologies.

            Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE and should not be longer than one page.  Please follow the instructions for the format of Individual Abstracts that will appear in the Program Guide of the October issue of the APA Newsletter.  Abstracts should be sent electronically in either Word 97-2004 for-mat with a .doc extension or as a PDF to: Stephen Tracy, Vice-President, ASGLE at stracy@ias.edu. The deadline is February 1, 2009.

29 October, 2008

A Census of Digital Epigraphy

Filed under: AIEGL,ASGLE,methodology,news,publications,query — Tom Elliott @ 17:16

Dear colleagues and friends:

(Apologies for cross-postings to lists. Please feel free to forward to colleagues, students and other discussion fora.)

Please send me (tom.elliott@nyu.edu) information about digital projects, publications and computer-aided research in epigraphy. This information will be used to update or inform multiple resources including:

  • The “ASGLE links” resource (currently out of date): http://www.case.edu/artsci/clsc/asgle/links.html
  • A section on “digital epigraphy” in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Latin Epigraphy
  • A review of the state of the discipline to be presented at the ASGLE-sponsored session of the Joint Meetings of the APA/AIA in Philadelphia in January 2009

I am interested in any undertaking that involves computational approaches or digital data, whether it has resulted in publication or not. Any subdiscipline of epigraphy (Latin, Greek, other) is of interest. Information about papyrological and palaeographical projects whose methodology, technology or content has direct application in epigraphic study is also welcome.

The ASGLE links update will include a software upgrade, and will be carried out in collaboration with the editorial board of Current Epigraphy and the leadership and appropriate committees of the Association Internationale d’ Épigraphie Grecque et Latine and of the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy. All information presented in the resulting “new” links collection will be released to the public under terms of a Creative Commons Attribution license so that it can be re-used freely by others. All information sent to me will be assumed to be the intellectual property of the person submitting it, and will be treated under terms of the CC license.

Ideally, I would like to have as much of the following information as possible (please feel free to use your native language):

  • Title of project, resource or publication
  • Principal investigator(s), author(s) or editor(s)
  • Intitutional affiliation(s)
  • URLs for websites
  • Publication citation(s)
  • A short description
  • Status (e.g., experimental, complete, published, in progress, continuing, private)
  • Technologies, methodologies used
  • Sources of funding (past and present)
  • Contact email address

Thank you for your assistance in this endeavor.

Best,
Tom

Tom Elliott
Associate Director for Digital Programs
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
New York University
http://homepages.nyu.edu/~te20/

22 October, 2008

ASGLE News

Filed under: ASGLE,news — PaulIversen @ 17:02

Here is the latest news from the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy:

- CALL FOR PAPERS, 2010 ASGLE Joint APA/AIA Panel, Orange County (Anaheim), CA January 6-9, 2010 (Wed. – Sat.)

Greek and Latin Inscriptions: New Discoveries, organizers: Stpehen V. Tracy and Paul Iversen

As archaeological artifacts that preserve writing from the ancient past, inscriptions constitute one of our most valuable primary sources of evidence for the ancient Mediterranean world. Their importance cannot be stressed too much. The Society seeks to create a panel that will offer to the audience new and exciting discoveries about Greek and Latin inscriptions. The Society, therefore, welcomes papers that present new texts, new joins, new archaeological find spots, new readings, new interpretations or new methodologies. We are particularly interested in papers that discuss truly new and important texts or really innovative interpretations or methodologies.

Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE and should not be longer than one page. Please follow the instructions for the format of Individual Abstracts that will appear in the Program Guide of the October issue of the APA Newsletter. Abstracts should be sent electronically in either Word 97-2004 format with a .doc extension or as a PDF to: Stephen Tracy, Vice-President, ASGLE at stracy@ias.edu. The deadline is February 1, 2009.

- ASGLE has money for Dissertation Research Awards. These awards consist in travel money for a student working on an epigraphical dissertation to visit a collection somewhere. Send in a proposal to the Secretary-Treasurer (paul.iversen@cwru.edu) with a letter of support from your advisor. All applicants should be members of ASGLE and will be required to write up a report.

- The Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies at The Ohio State University offers short-term fellowships (of one to four months duration) to support visitors pursuing post-doctoral research in Greek and Latin history and epigraphy. See the Center’s web page for the application guidelines.

- The University of Cincinnati Classics Department offers research support with their Margo Tytus Visiting Scholars Program. For more information and application guidelines, see here.

- The Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies at the Ohio State University offers a summer course in Greek epigraphy July 27 – August 7, 2009. For more information, see here.

- The Vergilian Society will be sponsoring some summer 2009 tours. See the Society’s web page for more information.

- Rex Wallace, UMass Amherst, recently published Zikh Rasna, A Manual of the Etruscan Language and Inscriptions.

-The ATHENIANS PROJECT is pleased to announce the recent publication of 2 more volumes of Persons of Ancient Athens.

Volume 16: Sym- to Tychonides, xviii + 481pp ISBN 978-0-0685232-9-2

Volume 17: U- to Philostratos, xviii + 399pp ISBN 978-0-9810250-0-1

All volumes 1-17 are in print and available at ATHENIANS, Victoria College, Toronto, ON M5S 1K7, Canada. Website: chass.utoronto.ca/attica. A special discount is granted to members of ASGLE and to their affiliated institutions.

For more information on how to become a member of ASGLE, see the Society’s web page.

16 January, 2008

CFP last chance: The Publication and Study of Inscriptions in the Age of the Computer

Filed under: ASGLE,events — Tom Elliott @ 17:09

A reminder that proposals for papers to be included in the following panel are due 1 February 2008:

CALL FOR PAPERS
2009 ASGLE Joint AIA/APA Panel
Philadelphia, PA, January 8-11 2009

The Publication and Study of Inscriptions in the Age of the Computer
Organized by Paul Iversen and Tom Elliott

The computer age has unleashed powerful new technologies that enhance the study of Greek and Latin inscriptions, yet most scholars, academic institutions and publishing houses are still not comfortable with the idea of publishing inscriptions in a form that takes full advantage of the new possibilities. The Society, therefore, welcomes papers that discuss current or possible future computer-enhanced initiatives in the areas of Greek and Latin Epigraphy. We are particularly interested in papers that discuss theoretical applications of new technologies to the field of epigraphy and the formulation of international standards and protocols of publication and institutional credit, especially digital projects that go well beyond the mere encoding of the appearance of epigraphical sigla and indicia (which is akin to putting old wine into new wineskins) to include the en-coding of semantic and/or observational distinctions.

Abstracts will be adjudicated anonymously by a committee of ASGLE and should not be longer than one page. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that will appear in the October issue of the APA Newsletter. Abstracts should be sent to: Paul A. Iversen, ASGLE Secretary-Treasurer, Department of Classics, Case Western Reserve University, 11201 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7111 or paul.iversen (at) cwru.edu. The deadline is February 1, 2008.

3 January, 2008

Epigraphy at APA/AIA 2008

Filed under: ASGLE,events — Tom Elliott @ 16:22

UPDATE: added links to all the abstracts I could find

The following sessions at the joint annual meetings of the American Philological Association and the Archaeological Institute of America look epigraphical:

Friday, 4 January

Saturday, 5 January

  • The Objects of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, sponsored by the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (Regency B; 9:00 a.m. – noon; Catherine M. Keesling, organizer; evidently no abstracts available online)
    • Inscribing Laws and the Emergence of Monumental Writing in Ancient Greece (Julia Lougovaya, Columbia University)
    • Graffiti Inscriptions on Pottery from Azoria, Crete: Mixed Ethnicities? (William C. West, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
    • Instructions on Stone: Leges Sacrae on Stone Offering Boxes (Thesauroi) (Isabelle A. Pafford, San Francisco State University)
    • The Uses of Sundials (George W. Houston, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
    • How to Read an Ossuary Inscription (Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University)
    • Recommended by Doctors: Writing Change in Roman Britain (Carolynn Roncaglia, University of California, Berkeley)
  • Italian Epigraphy (Columbus Hall IJ; 11:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.; Clifford Ando, presider)

I’ll blog later today about geographical space-and-place talks, as well as sessions touching on digital humanities. That will be over at horothesia.

1 June, 2007

ASGLE Newsletter 11.1, 15 May 2007

Filed under: ASGLE,events,news,publications,training — Tom Elliott @ 19:07

The latest issue of the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy Newsletter has arrived. Paul Iversen (secretary-treasurer) informs us via email that he hopes to begin posting newsletter issues, including back issues, on the ASGLE website beginning fall 2007.

Table of contents:

7 May, 2007

ASGLE News

Filed under: AIEGL,ASGLE,news — PaulIversen @ 17:45

The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy has a new URL:

http://www.case.edu/artsci/clsc/asgle/

Membership in ASGLE for one calendar year costs $30 USD for regular faculty, which also automatically enrolls you into the Association Internationationale pour l’Epigraphie Grecque et Latine (AIEGL). Students, retirees and independent scholars who do not wish to belong to AIEGL may pay $10 USD.

For those of you who wish to renew your membership or join for the first time, if you go to the Membership Page you will see that for a modest service fee you can now pay dues online with a credit card using PayPal. My understanding is that PayPal will accept multiple currencies, so those of you who wish to pay with other legal tender besides the USD and are willing to use a credit card, should be able to do so now. Neither I nor any other member of ASGLE will ever see your financial information. Of course for those who are more comfortable with the postal service, snail-mail is still available as well.

Those who register in the next few days will be eligible to receive a hard copy of the ASGLE Spring Newsletter, which is ready to go in the post and will contain Election Ballots for the offices of Vice President and Member-at-Large, a new text of IG II2 1069 by Elias Kapetanopoulos, and an epigraphical puzzler involving a Gothic painting, religion and sex!

Best,

Paul A. Iversen
Secretary-Treasurer, ASGLE
Assistant Professor
Department of Classics
Case Western Reserve University

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